jayfurr: (Default)

Worst Person In The World

I’m selling “Worst Person In The World” t-shirts as a fundraiser for next year’s Seattle Susan G Komen 3-Day walk. (I’ve got to raise $2,300 to take part in the event, a sixty-mile, three-day walk to raise funds for the fight against breast cancer.) The cost of each shirt includes approximately $20 for Susan G Komen. They make great holiday gifts!


Click here to order your shirt!


I grant you that there is NO CONNECTION between the message on the shirt and the fight against breast cancer, but from the look of things lately, nihilism is IN. Buy a shirt for that special someone in your life — or heck, buy one for yourself! And know that as you proudly announce your depravity to everyone you meet, you’re also supporting the fight against breast cancer!


Please re-share this!


jayfurr: (Default)

Seattle 2015In September I’ll be walking 60 miles in 3 days as part of the 2016 Susan G. Komen 3-Day walk… a walk to raise funds for the fight against breast cancer. This is my 9th year taking part in the Susan G. Komen 3-Day walk series and this is my 26th walk overall. In order to take part, I have to raise a minimum of $2300, but of course, I’d like to raise much more. Funds raised by the walk go to fund research, education, treatment, and early detection.


I personally feel very strongly about each person’s right to live a full, happy lifetime, and moreover, that there are few things more tragic than the story of a life being cut short early, like a novel whose author just lost interest and gave up. Cancer sucks. I lost my father this year (to old age, essentially) at the age of 84 and I know how much that hurt – and he had a full, long life. How much more must it hurt to lose a wife or mother or sister or daughter to something that comes like a thief in the night?


I know, though, that everyone has their own fundraising priorities, and I’m just grateful to have friends and co-workers that are so generous in so many causes. If you can and will sponsor me, I’d be very grateful, but if you’re already committed in other areas, I’m glad to know that your heart is open and always looking to help others.


If you do wish to sponsor me, you can do so here: http://www.the3day.org/goto/jayfurr


If you work for a company that offers matching, please take a few minutes extra to do that as well. There are many Susan G. Komen affiliates in the USA, but the one you should pick is the one with tax ID 751835298, with an address in Chicago, IL, as shown below.


Susan G. Komen 3-Day

/SUSAN G KOMEN BREAST CANCER FOUNDATION

55 E. JACKSON BLVD., SUITE 1010

CHICAGO, IL 60604

Telephone Number: 800-996-3329

Fax Number: 888-294-2557

E-mail Address: dsomers@event360.com

Website Address: http://www.The3Day.org

U.S. Tax ID/EIN: 751835298


Thank you so much for your support, and for all you do to make our communities and our world a better place in which to live. I am deeply grateful.


Thanks,


Jay


jayfurr: (3-Day Ambassador)
Last week I took part in the 2011 Boston Susan G. Komen 3-Day For The Cure. The walk, sixty miles in three days in record-breaking heat, raised $4.8 million for the fight against breast cancer. That's $4.8 million that will go to pay for research, treatment costs, screening costs, and even things you wouldn't think of, like paying for gas if someone needs help getting to a mammography center in the first place. And that's from just one of the 14 cities hosting 3-Day walks this year.

I didn't walk in Boston; I served as crew. Hauled garbage for three days, if it must be known. Stomped boxes. Carried around leaking trash bags full of bruised bananas and orange slices no one had eaten. In, for what it's worth, 103 degrees Fahrenheit heat. I looked and smelled absolutely awful. But I had it easier than the walkers who had to pound the pavement in those conditions.



Why did the 1700 walkers walk? Why did the 300-odd crew members give their time to support the walkers? And why will I be walking myself in San Francisco and Atlanta this fall?

Because we're trying to raise money for a fight that shows no sign of ending. Every 69 seconds a woman dies of breast cancer. Every 69 seconds someone's mom or sister or wife or daughter loses her battle. And that's a toll that is TOO DAMN HIGH.

So we walk -- we walk sixty miles in three days in hopes of impressing you enough with our commitment that you, in turn, write a check or type in a credit card number. Or hand over a $5 bill when you meet me training along some country road in Vermont. Or back a truckful of cured hams up to my driveway with instructions to sell it all and use the proceeds for the fight. (That last example hasn't happened yet, but I figure it's only a matter of time.)

This year it's been very hard to get people to donate to any charity. People gave more readily when the recession was officially still going, but now that it's over and the economy is ever so slowly creeping upwards and we're worried about a governmental default, people are saying "Maybe next year."

Well, "next year" may not come for a friend of mine. She's a survivor. She's fought cancer for years. And been declared "all clear". Well, let me have her tell you the bad news:

"Last night I found a lump under my left armpit. Same side my cancer was on. I'm freaking out. I am not ready to broadcast this ... but I needed your thoughts and prayers. I'm so scared."

Freaking terrific. :(

Will a donation from you for $120 mean that her lump will just vanish overnight?

No.

But will it make a huge difference in funding research so that "all clear" actually maybe means something someday?

Maybe so.

And if it does nothing but pay for a mammogram (and yes, $120 is about average) for a woman who can't afford one, someone you don't even know and won't ever meet, and if it helps her catch cancer early, while it's still treatable, then I'd call that a win.

So, yeah, I'd be grateful to have your support in the fight against breast cancer. In just a few weeks I'll be walking in the San Francisco Bay Area 3-Day, doing my own 60 miles on some of the biggest hills around, hoping to make a difference.

But remember: in the end, my walking won't make much of any difference at all. Your financial support will. So if you can help, please do. You can donate at http://www.the3day.org/goto/jayfurr or just click the big-ass picture below this paragraph.



And thank you. Everyone deserves a lifetime.


jayfurr: (3-Day Ambassador)
Last week I took part in the 2011 Boston Susan G. Komen 3-Day For The Cure. The walk, sixty miles in three days in record-breaking heat, raised $4.8 million for the fight against breast cancer. That's $4.8 million that will go to pay for research, treatment costs, screening costs, and even things you wouldn't think of, like paying for gas if someone needs help getting to a mammography center in the first place. And that's from just one of the 14 cities hosting 3-Day walks this year.

I didn't walk in Boston; I served as crew. Hauled garbage for three days, if it must be known. Stomped boxes. Carried around leaking trash bags full of bruised bananas and orange slices no one had eaten. In, for what it's worth, 103 degrees Fahrenheit heat. I looked and smelled absolutely awful. But I had it easier than the walkers who had to pound the pavement in those conditions.



Why did the 1700 walkers walk? Why did the 300-odd crew members give their time to support the walkers? And why will I be walking myself in San Francisco and Atlanta this fall?

Because we're trying to raise money for a fight that shows no sign of ending. Every 69 seconds a woman dies of breast cancer. Every 69 seconds someone's mom or sister or wife or daughter loses her battle. And that's a toll that is TOO DAMN HIGH.

So we walk -- we walk sixty miles in three days in hopes of impressing you enough with our commitment that you, in turn, write a check or type in a credit card number. Or hand over a $5 bill when you meet me training along some country road in Vermont. Or back a truckful of cured hams up to my driveway with instructions to sell it all and use the proceeds for the fight. (That last example hasn't happened yet, but I figure it's only a matter of time.)

This year it's been very hard to get people to donate to any charity. People gave more readily when the recession was officially still going, but now that it's over and the economy is ever so slowly creeping upwards and we're worried about a governmental default, people are saying "Maybe next year."

Well, "next year" may not come for a friend of mine. She's a survivor. She's fought cancer for years. And been declared "all clear". Well, let me have her tell you the bad news:

"Last night I found a lump under my left armpit. Same side my cancer was on. I'm freaking out. I am not ready to broadcast this ... but I needed your thoughts and prayers. I'm so scared."

Freaking terrific. :(

Will a donation from you for $120 mean that her lump will just vanish overnight?

No.

But will it make a huge difference in funding research so that "all clear" actually maybe means something someday?

Maybe so.

And if it does nothing but pay for a mammogram (and yes, $120 is about average) for a woman who can't afford one, someone you don't even know and won't ever meet, and if it helps her catch cancer early, while it's still treatable, then I'd call that a win.

So, yeah, I'd be grateful to have your support in the fight against breast cancer. In just a few weeks I'll be walking in the San Francisco Bay Area 3-Day, doing my own 60 miles on some of the biggest hills around, hoping to make a difference.

But remember: in the end, my walking won't make much of any difference at all. Your financial support will. So if you can help, please do. You can donate at http://www.the3day.org/goto/jayfurr or just click the big-ass picture below this paragraph.



And thank you. Everyone deserves a lifetime.


jayfurr: (Default)
Today my wife, Carole Furr, had her first-ever mammogram. I'm pleased that she did -- I want to keep her around for a long time, and even though she has very few of the risk factors for breast cancer, early detection is key.

You can read her narrative of what it was like here:

http://caroleotter.livejournal.com/51068.html

And please, ladies, take her advice. Don't be a prude about getting checked. It's fairly quick and simple (usually) and if you're going to get bad news, it's damn better to get it early than when it's too late. I want to keep ALL of y'all around!

jayfurr: (Default)
Today my wife, Carole Furr, had her first-ever mammogram. I'm pleased that she did -- I want to keep her around for a long time, and even though she has very few of the risk factors for breast cancer, early detection is key.

You can read her narrative of what it was like here:

http://caroleotter.livejournal.com/51068.html

And please, ladies, take her advice. Don't be a prude about getting checked. It's fairly quick and simple (usually) and if you're going to get bad news, it's damn better to get it early than when it's too late. I want to keep ALL of y'all around!
jayfurr: (3-Day Ambassador)
Tomorrow is kind of a special day.

I wish I could say it's the day we cash in a $5,000,000 lottery ticket, going public after carefully consulting with our investment advisors and the makers of Hostess Sno-Balls (I plan on investing heavily in Hostess Sno-Balls when my financial ship comes in). But it's nothing so cheery.

Instead, my wife Carole is going in for her first-ever mammogram. She turned 40 in October of last year and according to a lot of recommendations, it's time for her first, er, "boob-squishing". I wince at that term, but Carole's used it now and then after hearing from people who've already had the procedure. Apparently, in terms of dignified, heart-warming experiences that you'll just want to rush home and scrapbook about, a mammogram ranks right up there with a really thorough search/grope by a gang of bored TSA agents.

Or so I'm told. I've never had one. As a male, the odds are against my needing a mammogram, but on the other hand, I do, um, feel around now and then. (By "feel around", I mean self-examination of my own chest. Get your minds out of the gutter.) Mortality among men with breast cancer is much, much higher, percentage-wise, than it is among women, and I believe a lot of that is because men simply don't expect to get it and don't take appropriate action if and when they do feel something out of the ordinary. There's probably also a certain element of not wanting to be seen having a good self-grope. Very un-manly. You just know that someone would barge in without knocking and then it'd be all over your neighborhood. Before you'd know it rumors be circulating that you were dancing in your tighty-whities and lip-synching "I Touch Myself" by the DiVinyls.

Hell. Do it anyway, guys. Chicks dig sensitive guys.

(Right? Right?)

Carole has no family history of breast cancer. She's not on any kind of hormone replacements. She doesn't drink a lot. She hasn't been exposed to a lot of radiation. She's not currently using birth control pills. And so on. And so on. In fact, the only three risk factors that she can definitely be said to have are:

  1. never having had children

  2. growing older

  3. being female

But she's going in for her mammogram anyway.

Most women who are diagnosed with breast cancer have no family history of the disease. Carole is not immune just because she's never had a blood relative with breast cancer. That we know of. Remember, time was women who died of breast cancer simply were described as having suffered from a 'long illness'. People just didn't talk about it. For all we know, every one of Carole's female ancestors prior to her grandparents' generation had breast cancer. Unlikely, but possible. So we're not going to gamble with her life -- tomorrow morning, 8:30 sharp, she'll find out first-hand what a mammogram is really like.

I'll be saying few extra prayers tonight and hoping for the best.
jayfurr: (3-Day Ambassador)
Tomorrow is kind of a special day.

I wish I could say it's the day we cash in a $5,000,000 lottery ticket, going public after carefully consulting with our investment advisors and the makers of Hostess Sno-Balls (I plan on investing heavily in Hostess Sno-Balls when my financial ship comes in). But it's nothing so cheery.

Instead, my wife Carole is going in for her first-ever mammogram. She turned 40 in October of last year and according to a lot of recommendations, it's time for her first, er, "boob-squishing". I wince at that term, but Carole's used it now and then after hearing from people who've already had the procedure. Apparently, in terms of dignified, heart-warming experiences that you'll just want to rush home and scrapbook about, a mammogram ranks right up there with a really thorough search/grope by a gang of bored TSA agents.

Or so I'm told. I've never had one. As a male, the odds are against my needing a mammogram, but on the other hand, I do, um, feel around now and then. (By "feel around", I mean self-examination of my own chest. Get your minds out of the gutter.) Mortality among men with breast cancer is much, much higher, percentage-wise, than it is among women, and I believe a lot of that is because men simply don't expect to get it and don't take appropriate action if and when they do feel something out of the ordinary. There's probably also a certain element of not wanting to be seen having a good self-grope. Very un-manly. You just know that someone would barge in without knocking and then it'd be all over your neighborhood. Before you'd know it rumors be circulating that you were dancing in your tighty-whities and lip-synching "I Touch Myself" by the DiVinyls.

Hell. Do it anyway, guys. Chicks dig sensitive guys.

(Right? Right?)

Carole has no family history of breast cancer. She's not on any kind of hormone replacements. She doesn't drink a lot. She hasn't been exposed to a lot of radiation. She's not currently using birth control pills. And so on. And so on. In fact, the only three risk factors that she can definitely be said to have are:
  1. never having had children

  2. growing older

  3. being female

But she's going in for her mammogram anyway.

Most women who are diagnosed with breast cancer have no family history of the disease. Carole is not immune just because she's never had a blood relative with breast cancer. That we know of. Remember, time was women who died of breast cancer simply were described as having suffered from a 'long illness'. People just didn't talk about it. For all we know, every one of Carole's female ancestors prior to her grandparents' generation had breast cancer. Unlikely, but possible. So we're not going to gamble with her life -- tomorrow morning, 8:30 sharp, she'll find out first-hand what a mammogram is really like.

I'll be saying few extra prayers tonight and hoping for the best.
jayfurr: (2010 3-Day Walker)
I thank the many, many people who shared their point of view on whether or not I should seek to go along and watch and/or keep my wife company during her first-ever mammogram. I was open to the idea but wondered if it would be seen as weird or inconvenient by the staff of the clinic... and some people said "Heck no, my husband always comes along on mine" while others said "Um, the waiting area is women-only. We're in little gowns and all that."

It turns out that the clinic where Carole's going for her mammogram is one of the latter kind. The waiting area is women-only and at best I could wait in the outer waiting room, the general radiology waiting area, I guess. Interestingly, my not being welcome has nothing to do with them not wanting extra people around the x-ray equipment proper, as some people told me would be the case. My wife, as it turns out, is more than welcome to bring a female friend right into the mammogram room with her -- but not a male. It's hospital policy.

And then, as fate would have it, the whole thing became moot when a three-day class starting the day before the scheduled mammogram date suddenly started getting signups... and I'm the only instructor who teaches said class, so I guess I'm locked in now.

In any case, I wish Carole well with her mammogram. She has no history of breast cancer in her family bloodline, but as we all know, that's not a 100% guarantee that she'll never get it either. We just hope she won't... and if she does, of course, we want to detect it early. Now that she's 40, depending on who you talk to, she needs a yearly mammogram. I wonder if there's an Hallmark or American Greetings card to send someone on the occasion of her very first.



jayfurr: (2010 3-Day Walker)
I thank the many, many people who shared their point of view on whether or not I should seek to go along and watch and/or keep my wife company during her first-ever mammogram. I was open to the idea but wondered if it would be seen as weird or inconvenient by the staff of the clinic... and some people said "Heck no, my husband always comes along on mine" while others said "Um, the waiting area is women-only. We're in little gowns and all that."

It turns out that the clinic where Carole's going for her mammogram is one of the latter kind. The waiting area is women-only and at best I could wait in the outer waiting room, the general radiology waiting area, I guess. Interestingly, my not being welcome has nothing to do with them not wanting extra people around the x-ray equipment proper, as some people told me would be the case. My wife, as it turns out, is more than welcome to bring a female friend right into the mammogram room with her -- but not a male. It's hospital policy.

And then, as fate would have it, the whole thing became moot when a three-day class starting the day before the scheduled mammogram date suddenly started getting signups... and I'm the only instructor who teaches said class, so I guess I'm locked in now.

In any case, I wish Carole well with her mammogram. She has no history of breast cancer in her family bloodline, but as we all know, that's not a 100% guarantee that she'll never get it either. We just hope she won't... and if she does, of course, we want to detect it early. Now that she's 40, depending on who you talk to, she needs a yearly mammogram. I wonder if there's an Hallmark or American Greetings card to send someone on the occasion of her very first.



Mammogram

Apr. 7th, 2011 04:22 pm
jayfurr: (2010 3-Day Walker)
Carole just scheduled her first-ever mammogram (she turned 40 in October). And when she got off the phone, she turned and asked me "Do you want to come along?" I was a tiny bit nonplussed, to say the least -- it's not that I'm uncomfortable with the idea, but it had never occurred to me to come along and, um, spectate.

I wonder if doctors get a lot of curious 3-Day husbands coming along to see what it's all about first-hand. Or asking to, anyway. Yes, it'd be interesting from a dedicated anti-breast-cancer-guy point of view, but on the other hand, I'm afraid the nurses and techs and so on would find the whole idea a bit creepy.

Thoughts?



Mammogram

Apr. 7th, 2011 04:21 pm
jayfurr: (2010 3-Day Walker)
Carole just scheduled her first-ever mammogram (she turned 40 in October). And when she got off the phone, she turned and asked me "Do you want to come along?" I was a tiny bit nonplussed, to say the least -- it's not that I'm uncomfortable with the idea, but it had never occurred to me to come along and, um, spectate.

I wonder if doctors get a lot of curious 3-Day husbands coming along to see what it's all about first-hand. Or asking to, anyway. Yes, it'd be interesting from a dedicated anti-breast-cancer-guy point of view, but on the other hand, I'm afraid the nurses and techs and so on would find the whole idea a bit creepy.

Thoughts?



jayfurr: (2010 3-Day Walker)
Following up to my own post from yesterday, on the subject of "ZOMG KOMEN IS SUING OTHER CHARITIES FOR USE OF 'FOR THE CURE'!!!!"

No, they're not. They do oppose trademark registrations that would conflict with their own trademarks or mislead the public. Many of the trademark registrations they've opposed have been from private companies seeking to profit off goods labeled 'FOR THE CURE' without giving ANY money to charity. But there have been NO SUITS.

And as for "fighting other charities and wasting donor money?"

They have opposed SIXTEEN trademark registration attempts. SINCE 1982.

Let's repeat that: In 29 years they have opposed SIXTEEN trademark registration attempts filed by other charities. An average of less than one per year.

Please read the actual facts:

http://ww5.komen.org/uploadedFiles/Content_Binaries/TrademarkResponse122010.pdf

jayfurr: (2010 3-Day Walker)
Following up to my own post from yesterday, on the subject of "ZOMG KOMEN IS SUING OTHER CHARITIES FOR USE OF 'FOR THE CURE'!!!!"

No, they're not. They do oppose trademark registrations that would conflict with their own trademarks or mislead the public. Many of the trademark registrations they've opposed have been from private companies seeking to profit off goods labeled 'FOR THE CURE' without giving ANY money to charity. But there have been NO SUITS.

And as for "fighting other charities and wasting donor money?"

They have opposed SIXTEEN trademark registration attempts. SINCE 1982.

Let's repeat that: In 29 years they have opposed SIXTEEN trademark registration attempts filed by other charities. An average of less than one per year.

Please read the actual facts:

http://ww5.komen.org/uploadedFiles/Content_Binaries/TrademarkResponse122010.pdf

jayfurr: (2010 3-Day Walker)
Many people have heard recently, via a Huffington Post article or via a story that aired on the Colbert Report, that the Susan G. Komen organization is allegedly spending millions of donor dollars suing organizations that attempt to use the phrase "For The Cure" in their own fundraising activities.

I've been very bothered by these stories. Yes, they have a grain of truth to them. There have been legal efforts brought by Susan G. Komen For The Cure.

However, the truth is more nuanced than one might, at first blush, think. Here's my take on things:

First: I do not work for Susan G. Komen For The Cure or any of its affiliates. Nor am I an attorney.

That being said, it is an unfortunate fact of American trademark law that if you do not 'defend' your trademark, you lose it.

Susan G. Komen has invested a great deal of time and effort in guaranteeing that when someone donates to an organization or cause with "For The Cure" in its name, they are donating to an organization that they can trust and that will use the funds in a good way.

If they literally let anyone with good intentions use "For The Cure", they are extending their reputation into areas they cannot control and potentially risking everything they've built. I've gotten plenty of fundraising calls from fly-by-night organizations that turn over a tiny, tiny percentage of the funds they raise to the actual cause they claim to support. If Komen did not take action to protect their trademark, people might well donate to, oh, "Hikers For The Cure" only to find out later than everything donated went to line the organizers' pockets. This happens a LOT more often than you might think.

When an organization chooses to represent itself as "_____ For The Cure", rather than coming up with their own name, they're doing it precisely BECAUSE of the good will the Komen organization has built up and the trust the American people have in that phrase. Komen has a responsibility to see to it that the name continues to only be used by organizations that are trusted and responsible, and who will see to it that the donated money goes where the donors THINK it's going: to the fight against breast cancer.

Unfortunately, some of the organizations who chose to 'borrow' For The Cure chose to fight rather than cooperate ... and that's too bad, because the Komen organization has been more than willing to work out compromises that would permit use of the name, with a qualifier, such as when Kites For The Cure was allowed to use the term provided it was used in connection with the words "Uniting Against Lung Cancer" to make clear that it was not Komen-affiliated and that the money raised would NOT be going toward breast cancer.

That's the actual truth of this story -- and that's why, in the end, I am more than happy to continue volunteering and walking on behalf of Susan G. Komen For The Cure. Despite the bad press, no other organization comes close to the track record that the Komen organization possesses in the fight against breast cancer.

jayfurr: (2010 3-Day Walker)
Many people have heard recently, via a Huffington Post article or via a story that aired on the Colbert Report, that the Susan G. Komen organization is allegedly spending millions of donor dollars suing organizations that attempt to use the phrase "For The Cure" in their own fundraising activities.

I've been very bothered by these stories. Yes, they have a grain of truth to them. There have been legal efforts brought by Susan G. Komen For The Cure.

However, the truth is more nuanced than one might, at first blush, think. Here's my take on things:

First: I do not work for Susan G. Komen For The Cure or any of its affiliates. Nor am I an attorney.

That being said, it is an unfortunate fact of American trademark law that if you do not 'defend' your trademark, you lose it.

Susan G. Komen has invested a great deal of time and effort in guaranteeing that when someone donates to an organization or cause with "For The Cure" in its name, they are donating to an organization that they can trust and that will use the funds in a good way.

If they literally let anyone with good intentions use "For The Cure", they are extending their reputation into areas they cannot control and potentially risking everything they've built. I've gotten plenty of fundraising calls from fly-by-night organizations that turn over a tiny, tiny percentage of the funds they raise to the actual cause they claim to support. If Komen did not take action to protect their trademark, people might well donate to, oh, "Hikers For The Cure" only to find out later than everything donated went to line the organizers' pockets. This happens a LOT more often than you might think.

When an organization chooses to represent itself as "_____ For The Cure", rather than coming up with their own name, they're doing it precisely BECAUSE of the good will the Komen organization has built up and the trust the American people have in that phrase. Komen has a responsibility to see to it that the name continues to only be used by organizations that are trusted and responsible, and who will see to it that the donated money goes where the donors THINK it's going: to the fight against breast cancer.

Unfortunately, some of the organizations who chose to 'borrow' For The Cure chose to fight rather than cooperate ... and that's too bad, because the Komen organization has been more than willing to work out compromises that would permit use of the name, with a qualifier, such as when Kites For The Cure was allowed to use the term provided it was used in connection with the words "Uniting Against Lung Cancer" to make clear that it was not Komen-affiliated and that the money raised would NOT be going toward breast cancer.

That's the actual truth of this story -- and that's why, in the end, I am more than happy to continue volunteering and walking on behalf of Susan G. Komen For The Cure. Despite the bad press, no other organization comes close to the track record that the Komen organization possesses in the fight against breast cancer.

jayfurr: (2010 3-Day Walker)
I will match, personally, from my own pocket, any and all donations made on my behalf to Susan G. Komen 3-Day For The Cure for the two 3-Day walks I'll be taking part in during 2011 (Atlanta and San Francisco). Since my employer will match 100% of my donations, your donation will be multiplied by 3.

I need to raise $2,300 per city, for a total of $4,600 (minimum) in order to take part in the two walks I'm planning on doing next year. If I can raise $1,533.33 from you wonderful folks out there, match it with my own donation, then get THAT matched by my employer, I'll have made my minimum. Again, I will match ANY and ALL donations -- up to the point where I make my minimum for each city.

I would like, obviously, to raise much more than $4,600. Each dollar I raise makes a huge difference in the fight against breast cancer via research, education, treatment, and detection. And with 1 in 8 women being affected by breast cancer (and 40,000 deaths from it last year in the USA alone), it's a fight we can't afford NOT to wage.

If you would be willing to help with a donation, please click below:
All donations are 100% tax deductible and you will be sent a receipt for your taxes immediately upon donating.

I thank you from the bottom of my heart for any help you can give us in the fight against this killer. Everyone deserves a lifetime.

jayfurr: (2010 3-Day Walker)
I will match, personally, from my own pocket, any and all donations made on my behalf to Susan G. Komen 3-Day For The Cure for the two 3-Day walks I'll be taking part in during 2011 (Atlanta and San Francisco). Since my employer will match 100% of my donations, your donation will be multiplied by 3.

I need to raise $2,300 per city, for a total of $4,600 (minimum) in order to take part in the two walks I'm planning on doing next year. If I can raise $1,533.33 from you wonderful folks out there, match it with my own donation, then get THAT matched by my employer, I'll have made my minimum. Again, I will match ANY and ALL donations -- up to the point where I make my minimum for each city.

I would like, obviously, to raise much more than $4,600. Each dollar I raise makes a huge difference in the fight against breast cancer via research, education, treatment, and detection. And with 1 in 8 women being affected by breast cancer (and 40,000 deaths from it last year in the USA alone), it's a fight we can't afford NOT to wage.

If you would be willing to help with a donation, please click below:
All donations are 100% tax deductible and you will be sent a receipt for your taxes immediately upon donating.

I thank you from the bottom of my heart for any help you can give us in the fight against this killer. Everyone deserves a lifetime.

Sad today

May. 8th, 2010 10:28 am
jayfurr: (3-Day Ambassador)
I have reached my minimum fundraising goal for Tampa and DC so I can now walk both cities. I thank everyone who donated generously and am grateful for your support. Per my promise, I will now HUSH UP about fundraising until June 19 -- the day I plan to walk 60 miles in 24 hours.

I should be pleased by the news that my fundraising total is almost at the $5000 mark. But I'm not, not really.

Last night, I was briefly and annoyingly wide awake for a while and wandered into my home office to check my email. I saw an email with the blessed subject line "A donation has been made on your behalf" and had the usual WOO HOO reaction. Then I opened it and saw the donor, and the amount, and said "Wait. She already donated VERY generously this year. And now she's given $500???" I immediately went to my 3-Day participant center and viewed the donor message left by my friend when she entered the donation -- and saw the horrible news as to why she'd given again, and given so generously. Cancer that had been in remission in someone she cares about ... isn't in remission any more. Let's just put it that way. I wrote and thanked my donor and said how sorry I was, then went upstairs to bed again and lay awake for about another hour, just staring at the ceiling.

I'm glad to be at $4767 with months to go before Boston, DC, and Tampa. But I wish that fundraising targets being reached didn't have to come at such an appalling human cost. It's times like this that the reason we walk comes home so powerfully. I've gotten donations from people after they lost a loved one, or in memory of a loved one, and I'm sad then too... but I can't help feeling absolutely rotten when I hear the news that someone who thought they'd beat cancer finds out the hard way that the monster's come back for another round, and who knows what the ultimate outcome will be?

Cancer sucks. :(


jayfurr: (3-Day)
I will be walking TWO 3-Day events in 2010 -- 60 miles in three days TWICE -- and must therefore raise double the $2,300 minimum. (The two cities I will be walking are Washington, DC in early October and Tampa Bay in late October.)

I have $1890 left to go... but can make the amount in a hurry with your help. If I can bring in $630 between now and Mother's Day, I will MATCH that amount and then my employer will match me! Your donation will effectively count triple!

(You don't have to donate the whole $630 yourself... the challenge is to raise $630 more spread out among all donors between now and the end of the day on Sunday, May 9.)

The donation URL is http://www.the3day.org/goto/jayfurr -- and thanks!

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