jayfurr: (2010 3-Day Walker)
I'm one of those cocky jerks who takes pride in having walked multiple Breast Cancer 3-Day walks without ever needing to board a sweep van or SAG bus. I have nothing against the sweep vans, nothing against the buses, and respect those who give their all and still have something untoward come up like a shin splint, stress fracture, severe blisters, etcetera, and as a result, wind up on the van or bus. Things happen. Injuries occur. But I'd just as soon they not happen to me... and so I train, train, and train some more.

Each year since 2008 -- my first 3-Day year -- I've anxiously awaited the end of the long Vermont winter and the beginning of what, to me, is "3-Day training season".   Unlike the lucky folks in Florida and Texas and California, we simply can't start training in Vermont the minute the 24-week countdown to the Boston 3-Day in July starts.   In March we still have snow piled high along the shoulders of roads.  Our sidewalks may have been plowed... but may also conceal black ice in patches that will yank your feet right out from under you.  I lost a cell phone to black ice on a walking path just a few weeks ago, obstinately determined to go for a walk outdoors despite the frigid weather.   On a stretch of apparently bare and clean blacktop along a community recreation path, my feet went right out from under me and I came down hard flat on my back.  I was fine, though a bit shaken, but my Droid smartphone, in my pants pocket, was not so lucky.

Yesterday, with temperatures in the high 50s and sun everywhere, my wife and I went out for what we thought would be a nice eight-mile training walk on a recreation path in Stowe, Vermont.    What fools we mortals be!   After a few hundred yards we realized why everyone we'd seen heading down the path was coming back only a few minutes later and leaving.  There was six inches of snow along long stretches of the path, tromped down by snowshoers and skiers, but snow nonetheless.   And not even just in the shady spots.   Pretty much everywhere.   The clean dry pavement at the beginning of the path was a deceptive lure, getting our hopes up... but once around the first bend, GOTCHA.

We did two miles... a mile out, and a mile back... on that path, planting our feet carefully.  It wasn't all that slippery, surprisingly.  It was kinda slushy... providing reasonably good traction but simultaneously doing a bang-up job of getting our shoes and socks just plain soaked.    So there we were in shorts and t-shirts, tromping along on a warm (to us, anyway) sunny day through endless fields of snow.   Eventually we gave up and turned around and went home.

It may have been a blessing in disguise, though, for what it's worth.   I've had another, non-weather-related, cross to bear lately: an uncomfortably painful and stiff left knee.

I never had a knee problem in my life until this winter when I decided to start training for a 5K by doing laps on an banked indoor running track.   The gym alternates the track direction daily to avoid having runners putting too much strain on their knees by always running in the same direction with the same banking, but I was playing it smart, only trying to run every other day... which meant that when I ran, I was always running clockwise.   And somehow, that really put a strain on the iliotibial band on the outside of my left leg, right where it meets the knee.  The second to last time I tried to run it started stiffening up painfully after a couple of miles, but I finished my 3 miles and went home.  By the time I got home, it was so stiff and painful I literally could not put my weight on it.

The next day it was fine and I thought "OK.  That was odd.  Hope it doesn't happen again."  And two weeks later, when I said "That's a long enough break, let's try running again" it became stiff and painful after two laps.    I stopped cold and went home, feeling very gloomy.  I thought, naively, that the leg would benefit from some cross-training: walking, maybe some bicycling, before trying to run on it again.  And I took a wait-and-see approach.

The leg didn't give me any trouble when I did a few 3-Day training walks at our local mall in March, nor did it stiffen up when we did a four-mile walk outdoors on the Burlington bike path last weekend.  But on Friday, I tempted the fates by sitting down on our crunch board at home and doing a series of crunches... and apparently pulled so much on my I-T band that within an hour I was limping and in great pain.

"Just !%%#!@$ great," I said.  I sat down at a table with an icepack around my knee and my foot up on a chair and thought dark thoughts.  Eventually I realized I was out of ideas and called a local physical therapy clinic to ask for an appointment.   I feel a little weird about asking for help with a problem that seems to only occur when I do certain injurious things.   When I go in after work on Wednesday for my appointment, for all I know, my leg may feel absolutely fine.    I wonder: are they going to have me run or do crunches or something to start it hurting so I can point and say "Yep, that's where it hurts?"

Sigh.

Friends who are runners act like this sort of thing happens to runners all the time, but that doesn't make me feel all happy-happy about it happening to me.  I have a hugely pessimistic attitude right now about my leg.  If I manage to make it hurt that badly just by running three miles, or, for God's sake, doing a short abdominal workout... wow, that's just pathetic.   And I have a fear that I'll keep injuring it and eventually get told that I need to really cut back on any activity that'll stress my leg, indefinitely.

The reality is almost certainly much less gloomy than that.  But I do tend to think gloomy thoughts when a reversal like this comes along.  It's a personal failing of mine.

So as I said, above, having to terminate yesterday's training walk after only two miles may have been a blessing in disguise.  Walking a full eight miles the day after making it hurt so badly that I couldn't walk on it might not have been such a smart idea.

I can't make up my mind how to think about this.  I walked just under eight miles on Thursday night -- eight miles on the roads of our little Vermont town -- and had no pain afterwards.  I did crunches the next day: severe pain within a few minutes.    Did the walking followed by the crunches do it, or was it the crunches alone?  I don't know.  I may never know.  My knee felt mostly okay after our two miles yesterday and it feels mostly okay today, but (perhaps because I'm thinking about it) it does feel a little tender.

I really, really hope I don't get told by the physical therapist to cut way back on the walking.  I like long-distance walking.  It helps keep my weight down, it keeps my blood pressure low, and it toughens up my feet and hips so I don't have any pain or discomfort when the time comes to actually walk 60 miles in 3 days.   If I had to give up long distance walking on the advice of a doctor, I'd be one sad guy.   As far as I can tell walking isn't what caused it.  It was almost certainly the running on a banked track after a lifetime of not being a runner... and the crunches may have exacerbated things on their own.   The eight miles the previous night probably had nothing to do with it... I wasn't stiff at all afterwards.

But I don't know.   And that peeves and annoys me.  I want to be healthy and able to do my normal very active summer stuff: walking and hiking and kayaking and you-name-it.  I don't want to be laid up every time I step outdoors and do anything that raises a sweat.

So I'm looking forward with nervousness and anticipation toward Wednesday's physical therapy appointment.  I want them to wave a magic wand and make it all better, or failing that, give me things to do that will keep it from recurring.  I do not want to have to cut back on my walking and I really don't want to get told that the walking caused the pain ... especially if it didn't.   But if it did, then I need to know.

Yes, I'm getting very neurotic, aren't I?

 
jayfurr: (2010 3-Day Walker)
I'm one of those cocky jerks who takes pride in having walked multiple Breast Cancer 3-Day walks without ever needing to board a sweep van or SAG bus. I have nothing against the sweep vans, nothing against the buses, and respect those who give their all and still have something untoward come up like a shin splint, stress fracture, severe blisters, etcetera, and as a result, wind up on the van or bus. Things happen. Injuries occur. But I'd just as soon they not happen to me... and so I train, train, and train some more.

Each year since 2008 -- my first 3-Day year -- I've anxiously awaited the end of the long Vermont winter and the beginning of what, to me, is "3-Day training season".   Unlike the lucky folks in Florida and Texas and California, we simply can't start training in Vermont the minute the 24-week countdown to the Boston 3-Day in July starts.   In March we still have snow piled high along the shoulders of roads.  Our sidewalks may have been plowed... but may also conceal black ice in patches that will yank your feet right out from under you.  I lost a cell phone to black ice on a walking path just a few weeks ago, obstinately determined to go for a walk outdoors despite the frigid weather.   On a stretch of apparently bare and clean blacktop along a community recreation path, my feet went right out from under me and I came down hard flat on my back.  I was fine, though a bit shaken, but my Droid smartphone, in my pants pocket, was not so lucky.

Yesterday, with temperatures in the high 50s and sun everywhere, my wife and I went out for what we thought would be a nice eight-mile training walk on a recreation path in Stowe, Vermont.    What fools we mortals be!   After a few hundred yards we realized why everyone we'd seen heading down the path was coming back only a few minutes later and leaving.  There was six inches of snow along long stretches of the path, tromped down by snowshoers and skiers, but snow nonetheless.   And not even just in the shady spots.   Pretty much everywhere.   The clean dry pavement at the beginning of the path was a deceptive lure, getting our hopes up... but once around the first bend, GOTCHA.

We did two miles... a mile out, and a mile back... on that path, planting our feet carefully.  It wasn't all that slippery, surprisingly.  It was kinda slushy... providing reasonably good traction but simultaneously doing a bang-up job of getting our shoes and socks just plain soaked.    So there we were in shorts and t-shirts, tromping along on a warm (to us, anyway) sunny day through endless fields of snow.   Eventually we gave up and turned around and went home.

It may have been a blessing in disguise, though, for what it's worth.   I've had another, non-weather-related, cross to bear lately: an uncomfortably painful and stiff left knee.

I never had a knee problem in my life until this winter when I decided to start training for a 5K by doing laps on an banked indoor running track.   The gym alternates the track direction daily to avoid having runners putting too much strain on their knees by always running in the same direction with the same banking, but I was playing it smart, only trying to run every other day... which meant that when I ran, I was always running clockwise.   And somehow, that really put a strain on the iliotibial band on the outside of my left leg, right where it meets the knee.  The second to last time I tried to run it started stiffening up painfully after a couple of miles, but I finished my 3 miles and went home.  By the time I got home, it was so stiff and painful I literally could not put my weight on it.

The next day it was fine and I thought "OK.  That was odd.  Hope it doesn't happen again."  And two weeks later, when I said "That's a long enough break, let's try running again" it became stiff and painful after two laps.    I stopped cold and went home, feeling very gloomy.  I thought, naively, that the leg would benefit from some cross-training: walking, maybe some bicycling, before trying to run on it again.  And I took a wait-and-see approach.

The leg didn't give me any trouble when I did a few 3-Day training walks at our local mall in March, nor did it stiffen up when we did a four-mile walk outdoors on the Burlington bike path last weekend.  But on Friday, I tempted the fates by sitting down on our crunch board at home and doing a series of crunches... and apparently pulled so much on my I-T band that within an hour I was limping and in great pain.

"Just !%%#!@$ great," I said.  I sat down at a table with an icepack around my knee and my foot up on a chair and thought dark thoughts.  Eventually I realized I was out of ideas and called a local physical therapy clinic to ask for an appointment.   I feel a little weird about asking for help with a problem that seems to only occur when I do certain injurious things.   When I go in after work on Wednesday for my appointment, for all I know, my leg may feel absolutely fine.    I wonder: are they going to have me run or do crunches or something to start it hurting so I can point and say "Yep, that's where it hurts?"

Sigh.

Friends who are runners act like this sort of thing happens to runners all the time, but that doesn't make me feel all happy-happy about it happening to me.  I have a hugely pessimistic attitude right now about my leg.  If I manage to make it hurt that badly just by running three miles, or, for God's sake, doing a short abdominal workout... wow, that's just pathetic.   And I have a fear that I'll keep injuring it and eventually get told that I need to really cut back on any activity that'll stress my leg, indefinitely.

The reality is almost certainly much less gloomy than that.  But I do tend to think gloomy thoughts when a reversal like this comes along.  It's a personal failing of mine.

So as I said, above, having to terminate yesterday's training walk after only two miles may have been a blessing in disguise.  Walking a full eight miles the day after making it hurt so badly that I couldn't walk on it might not have been such a smart idea.

I can't make up my mind how to think about this.  I walked just under eight miles on Thursday night -- eight miles on the roads of our little Vermont town -- and had no pain afterwards.  I did crunches the next day: severe pain within a few minutes.    Did the walking followed by the crunches do it, or was it the crunches alone?  I don't know.  I may never know.  My knee felt mostly okay after our two miles yesterday and it feels mostly okay today, but (perhaps because I'm thinking about it) it does feel a little tender.

I really, really hope I don't get told by the physical therapist to cut way back on the walking.  I like long-distance walking.  It helps keep my weight down, it keeps my blood pressure low, and it toughens up my feet and hips so I don't have any pain or discomfort when the time comes to actually walk 60 miles in 3 days.   If I had to give up long distance walking on the advice of a doctor, I'd be one sad guy.   As far as I can tell walking isn't what caused it.  It was almost certainly the running on a banked track after a lifetime of not being a runner... and the crunches may have exacerbated things on their own.   The eight miles the previous night probably had nothing to do with it... I wasn't stiff at all afterwards.

But I don't know.   And that peeves and annoys me.  I want to be healthy and able to do my normal very active summer stuff: walking and hiking and kayaking and you-name-it.  I don't want to be laid up every time I step outdoors and do anything that raises a sweat.

So I'm looking forward with nervousness and anticipation toward Wednesday's physical therapy appointment.  I want them to wave a magic wand and make it all better, or failing that, give me things to do that will keep it from recurring.  I do not want to have to cut back on my walking and I really don't want to get told that the walking caused the pain ... especially if it didn't.   But if it did, then I need to know.

Yes, I'm getting very neurotic, aren't I?

 

Knee

Mar. 18th, 2011 09:41 am
jayfurr: (Phantom)
A couple of weeks ago I went for a run at the indoor track at the health club. My left knee started hurting during the run... and when I got home it had seized up so much that it hurt like CRAZY and didn't want to even bend properly. It hurt a lot less by morning but was still a bit sore for a couple of days.

As a consequence of this, I took two weeks off and didn't run. I did do some walking and had no knee issues (but did slip on ice in the dark and killed my cell phone when I landed flat on my back and apparently crushed it in my pocket, but insurance paid for a new one). So yesterday after work I said "Time go to to the gym."

And within a HALF MILE the damn thing began hurting again. And I wasn't able to run through it. I had to stop. It was either that or disable myself. The pain was increasing that rapidly.

I have two theories about the cause of the pain. Either I need to do a lot more post-winter-layoff limbering up, doing things like bicycling and road walking, before I just stick my knee out there on the track and begin pounding away at it, OR, I have some sort of unfortunate health condition that may contra-indicate running. I can feel some sort of tendon (I'm not an anatomist) flexing and popping on the left side of my left knee and that's really where the stiffness and soreness is centered.

The snow here in Vermont is rapidly melting; it's hard to believe we got a 29" snowfall less than two weeks ago, because a week of above-freezing daytime temperatures has knocked out most of it. Thus, it may be possible in the very near future to do some bicycling -- 17-18 miles to work a couple times a week should be good for me and hopefully gently flex that knee WITHOUT the pounding of running.

And if it still hurts after I do some bicycling, then I guess I'm going to have to go to a physical therapist or sports medicine professional and ask for advice. I feel pretty lame whining about pain after so little running, but I guess that's what I get for trying to start thrice-weekly running at the age of 43. :(



Knee

Mar. 18th, 2011 09:38 am
jayfurr: (Phantom)
A couple of weeks ago I went for a run at the indoor track at the health club. My left knee started hurting during the run... and when I got home it had seized up so much that it hurt like CRAZY and didn't want to even bend properly. It hurt a lot less by morning but was still a bit sore for a couple of days.

As a consequence of this, I took two weeks off and didn't run. I did do some walking and had no knee issues (but did slip on ice in the dark and killed my cell phone when I landed flat on my back and apparently crushed it in my pocket, but insurance paid for a new one). So yesterday after work I said "Time go to to the gym."

And within a HALF MILE the damn thing began hurting again. And I wasn't able to run through it. I had to stop. It was either that or disable myself. The pain was increasing that rapidly.

I have two theories about the cause of the pain. Either I need to do a lot more post-winter-layoff limbering up, doing things like bicycling and road walking, before I just stick my knee out there on the track and begin pounding away at it, OR, I have some sort of unfortunate health condition that may contra-indicate running. I can feel some sort of tendon (I'm not an anatomist) flexing and popping on the left side of my left knee and that's really where the stiffness and soreness is centered.

The snow here in Vermont is rapidly melting; it's hard to believe we got a 29" snowfall less than two weeks ago, because a week of above-freezing daytime temperatures has knocked out most of it. Thus, it may be possible in the very near future to do some bicycling -- 17-18 miles to work a couple times a week should be good for me and hopefully gently flex that knee WITHOUT the pounding of running.

And if it still hurts after I do some bicycling, then I guess I'm going to have to go to a physical therapist or sports medicine professional and ask for advice. I feel pretty lame whining about pain after so little running, but I guess that's what I get for trying to start thrice-weekly running at the age of 43. :(



Hey, ow

Mar. 2nd, 2011 09:14 am
jayfurr: (Yaaaaaaaagh!)
I went to the gym last night and ran another 5K. I didn't have a noticeable improvement in my ability to maintain a running speed for all 25 laps, but I didn't have to walk any more than I did this weekend. And I finished in 29:57 or so. Still under 30 minutes, but only just.

My left knee was feeling a bit stiff when I finished, but I grabbed my gear and jumped in the car and drove home. When I got home, I had a very rude surprise: my knee hurt. It mainly hurt if I tried to put any weight on it -- if I hopped on my right leg it was mostly okay, but straightening it out and planting weight on my left leg caused no end of "AAAAAAAAAAAAAARGH" moments.

I took ibuprofen and Carole brought me an ice pack, but even after icing it for a half hour it didn't feel better at all. I took a hot bath because I was still sweaty from the run and my knee felt better while in the tub, but then went right back to hurting afterward when I tried to shamble from the tub back to the bedroom.

[livejournal.com profile] caroleotter made the most of the opportunity to mock me, asking if I needed to be taken to the emergency room and stuff. I kept telling her "It'll be fine in the morning." Carole tends to over-dramatize things when she's ill or stiff or sore, no matter how much TLC and help I give her, and on occasion I've had to do the whole "if it hurts so much I guess we'll just have to CUT IT OFF" thing that moms sometimes do.

Unfortunately, she doesn't get that I'm only doing that to gently hint that she's gone, um, above and beyond the call of what's appropriate for a given situation. There's only so much I can do to make her comfortable when she's feeling achy or sick, after all.

So: when the shoe was on the other foot, she thought "Hot damn! Payback time!"

Sigh.

Denouement: my knee feels more or less fine this morning. I can tell that it was sore in that lingering-aftereffect kind of way, but it's certainly nothing I can't walk on. I'm at work and not at the emergency room. Carole (of course) then had to marvel out loud that my knee couldn't have been that bad if it could be all better today.

Some folks just don't have empathy. My dear wife is, unfortunately, one of 'em.


Hey, ow

Mar. 2nd, 2011 09:14 am
jayfurr: (Yaaaaaaaagh!)
I went to the gym last night and ran another 5K. I didn't have a noticeable improvement in my ability to maintain a running speed for all 25 laps, but I didn't have to walk any more than I did this weekend. And I finished in 29:57 or so. Still under 30 minutes, but only just.

My left knee was feeling a bit stiff when I finished, but I grabbed my gear and jumped in the car and drove home. When I got home, I had a very rude surprise: my knee hurt. It mainly hurt if I tried to put any weight on it -- if I hopped on my right leg it was mostly okay, but straightening it out and planting weight on my left leg caused no end of "AAAAAAAAAAAAAARGH" moments.

I took ibuprofen and Carole brought me an ice pack, but even after icing it for a half hour it didn't feel better at all. I took a hot bath because I was still sweaty from the run and my knee felt better while in the tub, but then went right back to hurting afterward when I tried to shamble from the tub back to the bedroom.

[personal profile] caroleotter made the most of the opportunity to mock me, asking if I needed to be taken to the emergency room and stuff. I kept telling her "It'll be fine in the morning." Carole tends to over-dramatize things when she's ill or stiff or sore, no matter how much TLC and help I give her, and on occasion I've had to do the whole "if it hurts so much I guess we'll just have to CUT IT OFF" thing that moms sometimes do.

Unfortunately, she doesn't get that I'm only doing that to gently hint that she's gone, um, above and beyond the call of what's appropriate for a given situation. There's only so much I can do to make her comfortable when she's feeling achy or sick, after all.

So: when the shoe was on the other foot, she thought "Hot damn! Payback time!"

Sigh.

Denouement: my knee feels more or less fine this morning. I can tell that it was sore in that lingering-aftereffect kind of way, but it's certainly nothing I can't walk on. I'm at work and not at the emergency room. Carole (of course) then had to marvel out loud that my knee couldn't have been that bad if it could be all better today.

Some folks just don't have empathy. My dear wife is, unfortunately, one of 'em.


Running

Mar. 1st, 2011 01:30 pm
jayfurr: (Zzyzx)
Today is 'running day' -- in other words, the day I need to get my butt to the indoor track over at the gym and run another 3.125 miles. My improvised training plan for running may seem self-evident (or stupid) to experienced runners, but what I'm planning is:
  • run a 5K every other day on the indoor track
  • try to run as many laps in a row as I can before having to slow down and walk a lap
  • try to exceed 30 minutes each time

That's pretty much it.

Until the snow clears from Vermont roads, I can't really run outdoors, not out where I live in the sticks. We have NO SHOULDERS when the snow is piled high and we have no dedicated running-biking-walking trails that far out in the country.

I grant you that I could go downstairs and run on the treadmill in my company's fitness center, but my experience has been that it's a lot easier to keep moving when you're on a treadmill than it is to keep hauling it around an actual track. I could obviously set the treadmill for a 6.2 mph pace and just have at it, but I'm trying to accustom myself to the actual work of running... and not just do a treadmill workout. So, for the time being, it's the gym.

Come the warm weather, if it ever comes (and locals don't have to have me explain that, but if you don't live in Vermont: this has been just about our snowiest winter on record), I plan to try running to town. My house is 3.1 miles away (counting our driveway) from "downtown" Richmond, VT along a moderately hilly two-lane paved road (Route 2) and I'd love to be able to walk out my front door, bounce thoughtfully on the balls of my feet, and then take off running... arriving at the stoplight "downtown" less than a half hour later. You can see the intended route here.

Any experienced runner would go "Pfaugh, is that all?" I'm not an experienced runner. I'm a 43-year-old man who can walk at 4+ miles an hour for essentially an unlimited amount of time but I've never been a runner. I love to bicycle and kayak and hike, and my endurance is good, but my ability to function at really high cardiovascular fitness levels just isn't there.

Yet.

Stuff

Feb. 27th, 2011 09:02 pm
jayfurr: (Coffee at Nickels)
This has been a weird year so far.

Until last week, I had been on the road EVERY SINGLE WEEK of 2011.

And I was battling severe depression. Depression so bad that after a very minor "why'd you skip the weekly team conference call?" query from my manager I was so bummed and full of I-am-so-useless thoughts that I found myself seriously considering calling up to quit my job. (I had somehow misread the cancellation of another meeting as cancelling our team scrum for that week, and upon being asked about this, absolutely couldn't even find the cancellation notice I'd misread let alone demonstrate whether or not it was in regards to our team meeting. Good times.)

Before you ask, I did not quit my job. I called my boss and told her how crazy and irrational and down on myself I was feeling, got reassured that I was not in imminent danger of being fired and in fact would be a huge loss for the team if I ever left, and then called our EAP to get a referral to a local counselor/therapist. And I went to the therapist last week and I dunno, I guess it helped some. I have another appointment this week. We'll see if that helps. Can't hurt, I guess.

This kind of depression isn't common with me. Okay, I'll be the first to admit that I can be moody. But I rarely have outright gonzo-level depression. My latest theory is that I need be more physically active and burn some of the crazy out.

Over the last few years, during the spring and summer and fall I've done a lot of walking to get ramped up for the Susan G. Komen 3-Day For The Cure walks... but come winter my level of activity has slowed down. This past November I made a brave noise of going to the hotel fitness center or gym each day and managed to actually carry through right up through Christmas, but ... then let things slide as my schedule got weird and busy in January. And that, combined with the winter weather (I've managed to be on the road and hit several blizzards in various cities, so, no, being away from Vermont hasn't helped) and short days, probably hasn't done my brain any good.

So last week, when I was actually here in Vermont and therefore able to actually make use of my gym membership, I went to the gym and tried, for the first time EVAR, to run a 5K on the indoor track. I found that I wasn't actually able to run continuously for the 25 laps that it would take to do 5 kilometers, but by running a lap, walking a lap, running a lap, walking a lap, etcetera, I was actually able to do the distance in 31 minutes or so. I went back a couple of days later and tried again and JUST slipped over the 30 minute mark: 30.01. Today I tried again and this time was able to run continuously for 10 laps before having to walk, and only walked four laps in all (if I recall correctly). My time was 29:52. Not a huge time improvement, admittedly, but I think I'm learning to moderate my running pace so it doesn't wear me out and therefore I can do more continuous laps, and I guess that's good. Once I can run 25 laps continuously I can work on decreasing the time each week.

I'm not trying to become a runner. I doubt I'll ever be one of those people who religiously has has to get out and run every day, but it can't hurt to increase my cardiovascular health. Obviously, as any 3-Day participant would leap to tell me, I can't run exclusively; I have to do my walking too if I'm going to continue my never-had-to-ride-a-sweep-van record in this year's San Francisco and Atlanta 3-Day walks. But that being said, running more often would probably be good discipline, probably helps my heart and my stress level, and, hopefully, will achieve the stated purpose of "burning the crazy out."


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